What’s Your Financial Personality?

Our ‘financial personality’ can apparently be revealed by the way we deal with our bank statements, as a Reader’s Digest survey reveals that there are five different approaches to the way we handle money:

1:The Evader. This financial personality is typical of 25% of the population. You join one of the 12.3 million Brits who avoid financial responsibilities by actively avoiding opening bank statements, and live in denial about the amount of debt owed.

Evaders need to learn to take a closer look at their finances. No matter how badly your credit card statements read, it is essential that you confront your financial situation. You may need to seek debt advice and take a hard look at your budget as it is likely that many evaders will have very little savings.

2: The Hoarder. The financial personality is typical of 14% of British adults. You are a hoarder if you are worried about your finances, and the fear may lead you to make unnecessarily cautious financial decisions. It is likely that you will have sufficient funds in your banks and pensions but hold back from any form pleasurable spending due to the strong feeling of guilt after a shopping splurge.

3: The Splurger. The splurger is just representative of 0.4% of the population, and are likely to fall victim to bouts of impulsive buying on credit cards, leaving them regularly in the red and needing debt help. This carefree attitude needs to be put into check as it could lead to a lifetime of money worries.

Other financial personalities include The Ambler who doesn’t worry about their finances until they hit a financial brick wall, and the Validator who spends or invests money in order to be recognised and to improve their own self esteem.

Although you might not believe in the idea of having a ‘financial personality’, it does pull up a very interesting point: we each have a different attitude to our own finances. Harvey Jones, an independent financial expert who writes for www.rdmoney.co.uk, says: “Your personality may dictate how you spend or save your money, but sometimes you have to fight against your own worst instincts.”